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Occupation Profile
Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

What do they do?

Perform any combination of light cleaning duties to maintain private households or commercial establishments, such as hotels and hospitals, in a clean and orderly manner. Duties may include making beds, replenishing linens, cleaning rooms and halls, and vacuuming.
Typical interests of people in this field:
Conventional, Realistic

What does this information tell me?

This description can give you a quick overview of what you might do if you worked in this job.

“Typical interests of people in this field” shows the main types of interests related to this occupation, based on categories from the Interest Assessment. You’ll see one, two, or three “interest types” that are strongest for the occupation.

You can read more about these interest types and learn more about your own interests by taking the Interest Assessment.

You can use this information to see if this career might be a good match for what you are interested in and like to do. 

What is the source of this information?

The occupation description and the related interests come from O*NET OnLine’s Occupation Information.

Also known as

  • Environmental Services Worker
  • Guest Room Attendant (GRA)
  • Chambermaid
  • Housekeeper
  • Cleaner
  • Housekeeping Aide
  • Cottage Attendant
  • Housekeeping Laundry Worker
  • Environmental Services Aide
  • Room Cleaner

What does this information tell me?

This is a list of other names for the occupation you selected. Sometimes different employers, industries, or parts of the country use different names for the same career.

You can use these names as substitutes for the career name when you’re looking for more information online or searching for job postings.

What is the source of this information?

These alternate titles come from O*NET OnLine’s Occupation Information.

Career video

Transcript:Maids and housekeeping cleaners keep things sparkling and sanitary, whether they work in a hotel, hospital, business, or home. While specific duties can vary greatly depending on the establishment, cleaners take responsibility for a space after others are done using it, or while they’re away, and return it to the state it needs to be in for guests, patients, and residents to be comfortable. Maids and housekeeping cleaners maintain many facilities in daily use: they make beds, replace linens, empty wastebaskets, wash dishes, and replenish supplies. When conditions are more seriously out of order, they may also order repairs and perform more in-depth cleaning such as shampooing carpets. They also report damage and thefts, and may supervise other workers. At hotels and hospitals, housekeeping cleaners often have responsibilities for a specific section of the facility, with duties such as keeping linens stocked and ordering supplies… whereas maids working in private households are more likely to perform errands or clean up by vacuuming, dusting and putting items away. Maids and housekeepers’ hours vary, ranging from full time, part time, to seasonal work schedules. Companies that contract out cleaning services may offer a variety of schedules and work environments. Maids and housekeeping cleaners do not usually require any formal education, although many have completed a high school diploma or equivalent.
View transcript

What does this information tell me?

This career video gives more information about the career you selected.

You can view the complete video script by clicking “View Transcript” above.

This video is one of hundreds of downloadable career videos in CareerOneStop’s Video Library.

What is the source of this information?

These career videos were produced by CareerOneStop (newer videos) or by a national video consortium, which includes many state workforce agencies. Data and information the videos are from the Occupational Outlook Handbook and O*NET OnLine’s Occupation Information.

How much does it pay?

Hourly wages for Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners in United States


Wage Chart for Occupation
$10.24 $14.46


Wage Chart legend for lowest 25 percent
  One out of four earn less than $10.24
Wage Chart legend for middle 50 percent
  Half earn between $10.24 and $14.46
Wage Chart legend for highest 25 percent
  One out of four earn more than $14.46



What does this information tell me?

This chart shows you a range of how much most workers in this occupation earn per hour, in the location that you selected.

The lower rate on the left shows what 25 percent of all workers in this field earn less than, and 75 percent earn more than. If you are just starting out, you can assume you might make closer to this amount than the higher amount, although this is not necessarily a “starting wage.” Often workers with more experience and training earn wages at the higher end.

You can learn more about wages for this and other occupations by clicking “See more wages” above.

What is the source of this information?

The wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program, a semi-annual survey that provides wage and employment statistics for the nation, each state, and sub-state regions.

Will there be jobs?

Image. Employment outlook for this occupation
New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

This occupation is:
  • Projected to have a large number of job openings


What does this information tell me?

Outlook information can tell you whether a career is expected to be in demand in the future—that is, whether there are likely to be job openings if you choose this career. Careers can have one of three outlooks:

  • A Bright outlook means new job opportunities are very likely in the future
  • An Average outlook means that a small number of new job opportunities are likely in the future (less than an 8 percent increase)
  • A Below average outlook means new job opportunities are less likely in the future

You can also view local job listings in this field by clicking "Find job openings" above. This can help you see if local businesses are hiring—another way of looking at demand.

What is the source of this information?

This information comes from O*NET’s Bright Outlook occupations. It is only available at a national level, so even if you selected a state, you’ll only see this information for the whole country.

How much education do you need?

Typical education needed for entry: No formal educational credential
Chart. Percent of workers in this field by education level attained

What does this information tell me?

There are two pieces of information here:

  • The first sentence tells you the typical level of education that you would need to start in this career. You can use this to see if you have, or want to get, the education level usually needed for this career.
  • The chart shows you the range of education levels that people who currently work in this field have. You can use this to see if you fit in this range.

Note that these two may be different since the chart includes ALL people who work in this field and not just those getting started.

For example, sometimes career requirements change. People already in the field may not be required to have the higher level of education that new workers need.

You can search for programs that lead to the education needed for this career in your local area, by clicking “Find local training” above.

What is the source of this information?

These data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections: Education and training assignments by detailed occupation, 2018; and Educational attainment for workers 25 years and older by detailed occupation, 2016–17.

What you might do in a day
  • Inventory materials or equipment.
  • Clean facilities or sites.
  • Move materials, equipment, or supplies.
  • Clean equipment or supplies.
  • Dispose of trash or waste materials.
  • Keep storage areas and carts well-stocked, clean, and tidy.
  • Carry linens, towels, toilet items, and cleaning supplies, using wheeled carts.
  • Clean rooms, hallways, lobbies, lounges, restrooms, corridors, elevators, stairways, locker rooms, and other work areas so that health standards are met.
  • Disinfect equipment and supplies, using germicides or steam-operated sterilizers.
  • Empty wastebaskets, empty and clean ashtrays, and transport other trash and waste to disposal areas.

What does this information tell me?

This is a list of typical tasks that people in this career might do on the job.  You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

Click on “More tasks” to see more detailed examples of activities for this career.

You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these tasks to use on your resume.

What is the source of this information?

This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. The first five items on the list are O*NET’s Detailed Work Activities. The second five, shown after you click “More tasks,” are O*NET‘s Tasks.