Skip to content
Logo Careeronestop
careeronestop
your source for career exploration, training & jobs
Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor.
A proud partner of the american job center network.

Occupation Profile

Learn details about any occupation including what you might do on the job, how much you might earn, and how much education or training you might need.

Get started by entering a keyword for a career, a job title, or a type of work in the box below. Then enter your location and click "Search". Or, click "List of Occupations" to select from a list of careers.

Maintenance and Repair Workers, General
Show More

Select items to add to your view

Overview


Employment


Wages

Education





Job Details






More Info


= not available for this occupation
Description: what do they do?
Perform work involving the skills of two or more maintenance or craft occupations to keep machines, mechanical equipment, or the structure of a building in repair. Duties may involve pipe fitting; HVAC maintenance; insulating; welding; machining; carpentry; repairing electrical or mechanical equipment; installing, aligning, and balancing new equipment; and repairing buildings, floors, or stairs.
Also known as:
Building Mechanic, Equipment Engineering Technician, Facilities Technician, Maintenance Engineer, Maintenance Journeyman, Maintenance Man, Maintenance Mechanic, Maintenance Specialist, Maintenance Technician, Maintenance Worker

    What does this information tell me?

    This description is a quick overview of what workers in this career might do.

    "Also known as" shows other common names for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from an O*NET database. Learn more on the Help page.

Career video
    Transcript: It takes a broad set of skills and knowledge to maintain buildings, including the ability to troubleshoot mechanical problems when they come up. General maintenance and repair workers employ those skills to fix and maintain machines, mechanical equipment, and buildings. They may repair roofs and floors, paint woodwork and walls, and fix other parts of buildings. When a more complicated problem arises, these workers also determine when it’s time to call in an electrician or plumber. General maintenance and repair workers may have to stand for long periods or lift heavy objects, work in very hot or cold environments, in cramped positions, or on ladders. They are employed in many locations, including office buildings, hospitals, stores, and factories. Most general maintenance workers work full time, including evenings or weekends, and may be on call for emergency repairs. They have a high risk of electrical shocks, falls, and cuts. Many in this field start out with simple tasks, observing and learning from skilled maintenance workers… then move on to more difficult tasks, such as overhauling machinery or constructing walls. High school shop classes and technical education are helpful.
View transcript
Outlook: will there be jobs?
Image. Employment outlook for this occupation
New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

This occupation is:
  • Projected to have a large number of job openings


    What does this information tell me?

    Outlook information can tell you whether a career is expected to be in demand in the future—that is, whether there are likely to be job openings if you choose this career. Please note that this does not account for the impacts of the current pandemic. Many occupations are likely to have very different outlooks due to the rapidly changing economy. When new outlook information is developed, it will be reflected here.

    Careers can have one of three outlooks:

    • A Bright outlook means new job opportunities are very likely in the future
    • An Average outlook means that a small number of new job opportunities are likely in the future (less than an 8 percent increase)
    • A Below Average outlook means new job opportunities are less likely in the future

    You can also view local job listings in this field by clicking "Find job openings". This can help you see if local businesses are hiring—another way of looking at demand.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET Bright Outlook occupations and My Next Move career outlook designations. Note this information is only available at a national level, so even if you selected a state, you’ll see this information for the whole country.

Projected employment
Wisconsin
35,300
2018 Employment
37,260
2028 Employment
6%
Percent change
3,710
Annual projected job openings
United States
1,444,100
2020 Employment
1,561,100
2030 Employment
8%
Percent change
152,300
Annual projected job openings

    What does this information tell me?

    Projected employment shows how much employment is expected to grow in this occupation over a 10-year period. This can help you decide if this career is a good choice for future job opportunities. You can look at projected employment in your state, or in other states where you might consider living.

    You can see the total number of people employed in this occupation in 2018 (for states) or 2020 (for the United States), the number expected to be employed in 2028 (for states) or 2030 (for the United States), and rate of growth over those years.

    The projections are based on assumptions of unemployment rates and labor productivity growth rates.  While the projected numbers may not be exact, they are helpful to compare one career to another, or one location to another.

    What is the source of this information?

    State-level data come from Projections Central and State Labor Market Information offices, 2018-28.

    National-level data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, 2020-30.

Typical wages

Annual wages for Maintenance and Repair Workers, General in Wisconsin
This graph displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
This chart displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
LocationWisconsinUnited States
10%$26,920$26,130
25%$34,410$32,020
Median$43,920$40,850
75%$54,390$53,150
90%$64,740$65,590


    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you a range of how much most workers in this occupation earn per hour, in the location that you selected.

    You can select from three views of this data:

    • The Graph shows you wages at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles. Note that the lowest (10th %ile) wage shown is not necessarily a "starting wage." Instead it means that 10 percent of all workers in this career earn less that this amount, and 90 percent earn more. However, you can assume that you might earn close to the 10th or 25th %ile wages when you start out in most careers.
    • Select "Chart" to see a visual comparison between national wages and wages in the location you selected.
    • Select "Table" to see more wage data the national and local level.

    Please note that wage data are not available at the city or ZIP code level. If you selected a city or ZIP code, you will see wage data for the regional area.

    You can learn more about wages for this and other occupations by clicking “See more wages” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    The wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics Program, May 2020 survey. For more detailed state wage data, please find the link to your state's wage data program in the Other Resources box.

Education and experience: to get started
People starting in this career usually have:
  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • No work experience
  • 1 to 12 months on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:
Typical education
How much education do most people in this career have?
Chart. Percent of workers in this field by education level attained

    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you the range of education levels that people who currently work in this field have. You can use this to see if you fit in this range. Note that this includes ALL people who work in this field and not just those getting started.

    Interested in getting qualified for this career? You can search for programs that lead to the education needed, in your local area, by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, Educational attainment for workers 25 years and older by detailed occupation, 2018-19.

Certifications: show your skills
Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:
  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find certifications" you'll see a list of national certifications that are related to this career. From there, you can learn how to achieve one of these certifications to help you enter or get ahead in this field.

    What is the source of this information?

    This collection of occupational certifications is collected and regularly updated by CareerOneStop. Learn more at Certification Finder Help.

Licenses: do you need one?
Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find license details in your state" you'll see the license name and contact information for the agency in your state that oversees licensing for this field. If you have not selected a location, you'll see a list of all state licenses for this occupation.

    What is the source of this information?

    Information on licensed occupations is gathered in each state by Labor Market Information units under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. Learn more at License Finder Help.

Apprenticeships: learn on the job
Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.

Activities: what you might do in a day
  • Replace worn, damaged, or defective mechanical parts.
  • Inspect mechanical components of vehicles to identify problems.
  • Test mechanical equipment to ensure proper functioning.
  • Inspect mechanical equipment to locate damage, defects, or wear.
  • Adjust equipment to ensure optimal performance.
  • Order materials, supplies, or equipment.
  • Install machine or equipment replacement parts.
  • Maintain work equipment or machinery.
  • Troubleshoot equipment or systems operation problems.
  • Read technical information needed to perform maintenance or repairs.
  • Test fluids to identify contamination or other problems.
  • Develop equipment or component configurations.
  • Install electrical components, equipment, or systems.
  • Repair electrical circuits or wiring.
  • Assemble electrical components, subsystems, or systems.
  • Clean equipment, parts, or tools to repair or maintain them in good working order.
  • Lubricate equipment to allow proper functioning.
  • Remove snow.
  • Perform manual agricultural, aquacultural, or horticultural tasks.
  • Estimate costs for labor or materials.
  • Record information about parts, materials or repair procedures.
  • Align equipment or machinery.
  • Operate welding equipment.
  • Disassemble equipment for maintenance or repair.
  • Operate cranes, hoists, or other moving or lifting equipment.
  • Measure distances or dimensions.
  • Plan work procedures.
  • Lay out work according to specifications.
  • Install energy-efficient heating, ventilation, or air conditioning (HVAC) equipment.
  • Assemble mechanical components or machine parts.
  • Fabricate parts or components.
  • Clean work areas.
  • Train others in operational procedures.
  • Supervise employees.
  • Repair structural components.
  • Assemble structural components.
  • Paint surfaces or equipment.
  • Install insulation in equipment or structures.
  • Grind parts to required dimensions.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical work activities that people in this career might do on the job. You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More activities” to see more detailed examples of activities for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these activities to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET’s Detailed Work Activities.

Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of general knowledge areas that are most commonly required for jobs in the career. Knowledge is typically gained through education and related experience.

    This list can help you learn if you are prepared for a job in this career. It can also help you decide on education or training programs that could help you prepare for the career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Knowledge descriptors.

Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Equipment Maintenance - Planning and doing the basic maintenance on equipment.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the right tools.
  • Troubleshooting - Figuring out what is causing equipment, machines, wiring, or computer programs to not work.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list the work-related skills most commonly required for jobs in the career.

    This list can help you understand how well your current skills fit this career. It can also help you plan your education or professional development.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Skills descriptors.

Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Near Vision - Seeing details up close.
  • Information Ordering - Ordering or arranging things.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness - Keeping your arm or hand steady.
  • Manual Dexterity - Holding or moving items with your hands.
  • Problem Sensitivity - Noticing when problems happen.
  • Visualization - Imagining how something will look after it is moved around or changed.
  • Control Precision - Quickly changing the controls of a machine, car, truck or boat.
  • Oral Expression - Communicating by speaking.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list of personal qualities that might influence work and are most commonly required for success in this career.

    This list can help you understand if your natural strengths and abilities are a good fit for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Abilities descriptors.

Interests
  • Conventional - Occupations related to Conventional interests frequently involve following set procedures and routines. They include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Investigative - Occupations with Investigative interests frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. They often involve research and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Realistic - Occupations with Realistic interests frequently involve practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of work environment-preferences that are most commonly associated with the career. It can help you understand if your natural interests are a good fit for this career.

    Click "Take an interest assessment" for a quick 30-question assessment that can help you understand your interests and see careers that might be good matches for them.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Interest descriptors.

Typical tasks
  • Perform routine maintenance, such as inspecting drives, motors, or belts, checking fluid levels, replacing filters, or doing other preventive maintenance actions.
  • Inspect, operate, or test machinery or equipment to diagnose machine malfunctions.
  • Adjust functional parts of devices or control instruments, using hand tools, levels, plumb bobs, or straightedges.
  • Order parts, supplies, or equipment from catalogs or suppliers.
  • Perform routine maintenance on boilers, such as replacing burners or hoses, installing replacement parts, or reinforcing structural weaknesses to ensure optimal boiler efficiency.
  • Diagnose mechanical problems and determine how to correct them, checking blueprints, repair manuals, or parts catalogs, as necessary.
  • Test and treat water supply.
  • Design new equipment to aid in the repair or maintenance of machines, mechanical equipment, or building structures.
  • Assemble, install, or repair wiring, electrical or electronic components, pipe systems, plumbing, machinery, or equipment.
  • Clean or lubricate shafts, bearings, gears, or other parts of machinery.
  • Provide groundskeeping services, such as landscaping or snow removal.
  • Estimate costs to repair machinery, equipment, or building structures.
  • Record type and cost of maintenance or repair work.
  • Align and balance new equipment after installation.
  • Maintain or repair specialized equipment or machinery located in cafeterias, laundries, hospitals, stores, offices, or factories.
  • Operate cutting torches or welding equipment to cut or join metal parts.
  • Dismantle machines, equipment, or devices to access and remove defective parts, using hoists, cranes, hand tools, or power tools.
  • Inspect used parts to determine changes in dimensional requirements, using rules, calipers, micrometers, or other measuring instruments.
  • Plan and lay out repair work, using diagrams, drawings, blueprints, maintenance manuals, or schematic diagrams.
  • Install equipment to improve the energy or operational efficiency of residential or commercial buildings.
  • Assemble boilers at installation sites, using tools such as levels, plumb bobs, hammers, torches, or other hand tools.
  • Set up and operate machine tools to repair or fabricate machine parts, jigs, fixtures, or tools.
  • Perform general cleaning of buildings or properties.
  • Train or manage maintenance personnel or subcontractors.
  • Lay brick to repair or maintain buildings, walls, arches, or other structures.
  • Fabricate or repair counters, benches, partitions, or other wooden structures, such as sheds or outbuildings.
  • Paint or repair roofs, windows, doors, floors, woodwork, plaster, drywall, or other parts of building structures.
  • Position, attach, or blow insulating materials to prevent energy losses from buildings, pipes, or other structures or objects.
  • Grind and reseat valves, using valve-grinding machines.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical tasks that people in this career might do on the job.  You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More tasks” to see more detailed examples for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these tasks to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET‘s Tasks.

    What does this information tell me?

    These are additional online resources related to this career. You may find different or more detailed information at these sources.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information is collected and maintained by CareerOneStop.