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Occupation Profile

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Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs
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Description: what do they do?
Drive automobiles, vans, or limousines to transport passengers. May occasionally carry cargo. Includes hearse drivers.
Also known as:
Driver, Limo Driver (Limousine Driver), Cab Driver, Motor Coach Driver, Taxi Cab Driver, Chauffeur, Airport Shuttle Driver, Van Driver, Shuttle Driver, Taxi Driver

    What does this information tell me?

    This description is a quick overview of what workers in this career might do.

    "Also known as" shows other common names for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from an O*NET database. Learn more on the Help page.

Career video
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    Transcript: Taxi drivers, ride-hailing drivers, and chauffeurs drive passengers to and from the places they need to go— whether they’re in a big hurry, or prefer to arrive in style. They must know their local area in detail, including popular destinations, emergency services, and the routes that best avoid rush hour traffic. Drivers follow local regulations, and keep tabs on weather and road conditions that affect driving. Taxi drivers pick up passengers from taxi lines at airports and hotels, or respond to dispatcher calls to pick up a customer. They charge based on a meter that runs while driving, and take breaks between passengers. Ride-hailing drivers set their own hours, and use their personal vehicles to pick up passengers who request service through a smartphone app. Chauffeurs drive limousines or private cars to take passengers on prescheduled trips. They may work for one person, a business or government agency, or drive a large hotel van. Paratransit drivers operate vehicles equipped with wheelchair lifts and other equipment to accommodate elderly passengers, or those with disabilities. Though many taxi drivers and chauffeurs work full time, part-time driving is not uncommon. Schedules may include late nights, early mornings, weekends, and holidays. Drivers experience the stress of heavy traffic, and must load heavy baggage. Drivers must have a regular driver’s license, but there are no formal education requirements… on-the-job training may be provided. Some positions also require a taxi or limousine license.
View transcript
Outlook: will there be jobs?
Image. Employment outlook for this occupation
New job opportunities are likely in the future.


    What does this information tell me?

    Outlook information can tell you whether a career is expected to be in demand in the future—that is, whether there are likely to be job openings if you choose this career. Careers can have one of three outlooks:

    • A Bright outlook means new job opportunities are very likely in the future
    • An Average outlook means that a small number of new job opportunities are likely in the future (less than an 8 percent increase)
    • A Below Average outlook means new job opportunities are less likely in the future

    You can also view local job listings in this field by clicking "Find job openings" above. This can help you see if local businesses are hiring—another way of looking at demand.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET’s Bright Outlook occupations. Note this information is only available at a national level, so even if you selected a state, you’ll only see this information for the whole country.

Projected employment
Nebraska
1,810
2016 Employment
2,060
2026 Employment
14%
Percent change
220
Annual projected job openings
United States
370,400
2018 Employment
442,800
2028 Employment
20%
Percent change
51,300
Annual projected job openings

    What does this information tell me?

    Projected employment shows how much employment is expected to grow in this occupation over a 10-year period. This can help you decide if this career is a good choice for future job opportunities. You can look at projected employment in your state, or in other states where you might consider living.

    You can see the total number of people employed in this occupation in 2016 (for states) or 2018 (for the United States), the number expected to be employed in 2026 (for states) or 2028 (for the United States), and rate of growth over those years.

    The projections are based on assumptions of unemployment rates and labor productivity growth rates.  While the projected numbers may not be exact, they are helpful to compare one career to another, or one location to another.

    What is the source of this information?

    State-level data come from Projections Central and each state's Labor Market Information office, 2016-26.

    National-level data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, 2018-28.

Typical wages

Annual wages for Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs in Nebraska
This graph displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
This chart displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
LocationNebraskaUnited States
10%$19,130$19,240
25%$20,130$22,150
Median$23,000$25,980
75%$27,130$32,180
90%$30,990$40,360


    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you a range of how much most workers in this occupation earn per hour, in the location that you selected.

    You can select from three views of this data:

    • The Graph shows you wages at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles. Note that the lowest (10th %ile) wage shown is not necessarily a "starting wage." Instead it means that 10 percent of all workers in this career earn less that this amount, and 90 percent earn more. However, you can assume that you might earn close to the 10th or 25th %ile wages when you start out in most careers.
    • Select "Chart" to see a visual comparison between national wages and wages in the location you selected.
    • Select "Table" to see more wage data the national and local level.

    Please note that wage data are not available at the city or ZIP code level. If you selected a city or ZIP code, you will see wage data for the regional area.

    Also note that in this update, 21 detailed occupations found within the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) were replaced with 10 new aggregations of those occupations; read more about these OES changes.

    You can learn more about wages for this and other occupations by clicking “See more wages” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    The wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program, 2018 data. For more detailed state wage data, please find the link to your state's wage data program in the Other Resources box.

Education and experience: to get started
People starting in this career usually have:
  • No formal educational credential
  • No work experience
  • Less than 1 month on-the-job training

    What does this information tell me?

    This shows you the typical level of education, work experience, and on-the-job training that most people have when they start in this career. Note that these are not requirements for entering this field, but the information can help you understand how qualified you might be.

    Interested in starting in this career? You can search for education programs in your local area by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, Education and training assignments by detailed occupation, 2018.

Typical education
How much education do most people in this career have?
Chart. Percent of workers in this field by education level attained

    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you the range of education levels that people who currently work in this field have. You can use this to see if you fit in this range. Note that this includes ALL people who work in this field and not just those getting started.

    Interested in getting qualified for this career? You can search for programs that lead to the education needed, in your local area, by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, Educational attainment for workers 25 years and older by detailed occupation, 2016–17.

Certifications: show your skills
Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:
  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find certifications" you'll see a list of national certifications that are related to this career. From there, you can learn how to achieve one of these certifications to help you enter or get ahead in this field.

    What is the source of this information?

    This collection of occupational certifications is collected and regularly updated by CareerOneStop. Learn more at Certification Finder Help.

Licenses: do you need one?
Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find license details in your state" you'll see the license name and contact information for the agency in your state that oversees licensing for this field. If you have not selected a location, you'll see a list of all state licenses for this occupation.

    What is the source of this information?

    Information on licensed occupations is gathered in each state by Labor Market Information units under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. Learn more at License Finder Help.

Apprenticeships: learn on the job
Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find apprenticeship sponsors" you'll find information that can help you locate apprenticeship opportunities in your state:

    • If there are businesses that have sponsored apprenticeships in this field in the past, you'll find their name and contact information.
    • If there are related occupations that might have apprenticeship opportunities, you'll find links to that information.
    • You'll also see contact information for state and federal agencies that oversee apprenticeship programs.

    What is the source of this information?

    Apprenticeship information comes from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeships, and from CareerOneStop. Learn more at Apprenticeship Finder Help.

Activities: what you might do in a day
  • Inspect motor vehicles.
  • Follow safety procedures for vehicle operation.
  • Report vehicle or equipment malfunctions.
  • Drive passenger vehicles.
  • Assist passengers during vehicle boarding.
  • Prepare accident or incident reports.
  • Maintain vehicles in good working condition.
  • Communicate with others to coordinate vehicle movement.
  • Schedule operational activities.
  • Record operational details of travel.
  • Receive information or instructions for performing work assignments.
  • Clean vehicles or vehicle components.
  • Collect fares or payment from customers.
  • Provide transportation information to passengers or customers.
  • Move materials, equipment, or supplies.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical work activities that people in this career might do on the job. You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More activities” to see more detailed examples of activities for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these activities to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET’s Detailed Work Activities.

Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of general knowledge areas that are most commonly required for jobs in the career. Knowledge is typically gained through education and related experience.

    This list can help you learn if you are prepared for a job in this career. It can also help you decide on education or training programs that could help you prepare for the career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Knowledge descriptors.

Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Active Listening - Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list the work-related skills most commonly required for jobs in the career.

    This list can help you understand how well your current skills fit this career. It can also help you plan your education or professional development.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Skills descriptors.

Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Far Vision - Seeing details that are far away.
  • Near Vision - Seeing details up close.
  • Oral Comprehension - Listening and understanding what people say.
  • Multilimb Coordination - Using your arms and/or legs together while sitting, standing, or lying down.
  • Control Precision - Quickly changing the controls of a machine, car, truck or boat.
  • Reaction Time - Quickly moving your hand, finger, or foot based on a sound, light, picture or other command.
  • Response Orientation - Quickly deciding if you should move your hand, foot, or other body part.
  • Time Sharing - Doing two or more things at the same time.
  • Depth Perception - Deciding which thing is closer or farther away from you, or deciding how far away it is from you.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list of personal qualities that might influence work and are most commonly required for success in this career.

    This list can help you understand if your natural strengths and abilities are a good fit for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Abilities descriptors.

Interests
  • Enterprising - Occupations with Enterprising interests frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. Many involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Realistic - Occupations with Realistic interests frequently involve practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of work environment-preferences that are most commonly associated with the career. It can help you understand if your natural interests are a good fit for this career.

    Click "Take an interest assessment" for a quick 30-question assessment that can help you understand your interests and see careers that might be good matches for them.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Interest descriptors.

Typical tasks
  • Test vehicle equipment, such as lights, brakes, horns, or windshield wipers, to ensure proper operation.
  • Follow relevant safety regulations and state laws governing vehicle operation and ensure that passengers follow safety regulations.
  • Notify dispatchers or company mechanics of vehicle problems.
  • Drive taxicabs, limousines, company cars, or privately owned vehicles to transport passengers.
  • Provide passengers with assistance entering and exiting vehicles and help them with any luggage.
  • Complete accident reports when necessary.
  • Perform routine vehicle maintenance, such as regulating tire pressure and adding gasoline, oil, and water.
  • Communicate with dispatchers by radio, telephone, or computer to exchange information and receive requests for passenger service.
  • Pick up passengers at prearranged locations, at taxi stands, or by cruising streets in high traffic areas.
  • Arrange to pick up particular customers or groups on a regular schedule.
  • Record name, date, and taxi identification information on trip sheets, along with trip information, such as time and place of pickup and drop-off, and total fee.
  • Report to taxicab services or garages to receive vehicle assignments.
  • Perform minor vehicle repairs, such as cleaning spark plugs, or take vehicles to mechanics for servicing.
  • Collect fares or vouchers from passengers and make change or issue receipts as necessary.
  • Determine fares based on trip distances and times, using taximeters and fee schedules, and announce fares to passengers.
  • Vacuum and clean interiors and wash and polish exteriors of automobiles.
  • Operate vehicles with specialized equipment, such as wheelchair lifts, to transport and secure passengers with special needs.
  • Provide passengers with information about the local area and points of interest or give advice on hotels and restaurants.
  • Pick up or meet employers according to requests, appointments, or schedules.
  • Perform errands for customers or employers, such as delivering or picking up mail and packages.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical tasks that people in this career might do on the job.  You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More tasks” to see more detailed examples for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these tasks to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET‘s Tasks.

    What does this information tell me?

    These are additional online resources related to this career. You may find different or more detailed information at these sources.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information is collected and maintained by CareerOneStop.