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Tire Repairers and Changers
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Description: what do they do?
Repair and replace tires.
Also known as:
Tire Repairer, Tire Shop Mechanic, Tire Center Supervisor, Lube Technician, Tire Installer, Tire Technician, Tire Buster, Alignment Technician, Tire Changer, Service Technician

    What does this information tell me?

    This description is a quick overview of what workers in this career might do.

    "Also known as" shows other common names for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from an O*NET database. Learn more on the Help page.

Career video
    Transcript: Tire repairers and changers keep vehicle tires rolling in good condition. Vehicle tires may be damaged by sharp objects, worn down by use, or need to be changed for seasonal road conditions. Tire repairers and changers use a hydraulic lift to elevate a vehicle for access to the wheels, then remove the wheels to perform the necessary maintenance. If a tire change is all that’s needed, tire changers pull off the old tire and reassemble the wheel with a new tire, inflating it to the proper pressure level. For damaged tires, repairers inspect tires and inner tubes, and remove items like nails or screws that have punctured the rubber, patch any holes, and then replace the tire. Working with vehicles and power tools presents some risk of injuries in this field, but following safety practices can eliminate most of the risk. Tire repairers and changers typically work more than 40 hours a week, at positions in tire shops, car dealerships, and auto service garages. Tire repairers and changers typically need a high school diploma. They use technical skills learned on the job or through technical training.
View transcript
Outlook: will there be jobs?
Image. Employment outlook for this occupation
New job opportunities are less likely in the future.


    What does this information tell me?

    Outlook information can tell you whether a career is expected to be in demand in the future—that is, whether there are likely to be job openings if you choose this career. Careers can have one of three outlooks:

    • A Bright outlook means new job opportunities are very likely in the future
    • An Average outlook means that a small number of new job opportunities are likely in the future (less than an 8 percent increase)
    • A Below Average outlook means new job opportunities are less likely in the future

    You can also view local job listings in this field by clicking "Find job openings" above. This can help you see if local businesses are hiring—another way of looking at demand.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET Bright Outlook occupations, 2019. Note this information is only available at a national level, so even if you selected a state, you’ll only see this information for the whole country.

Projected employment
United States
114,500
2018 Employment
106,400
2028 Employment
-7%
Percent change
11,400
Annual projected job openings

    What does this information tell me?

    Projected employment shows how much employment is expected to grow in this occupation over a 10-year period. This can help you decide if this career is a good choice for future job opportunities. You can look at projected employment in your state, or in other states where you might consider living.

    You can see the total number of people employed in this occupation in 2016 (for states) or 2018 (for the United States), the number expected to be employed in 2026 (for states) or 2028 (for the United States), and rate of growth over those years.

    The projections are based on assumptions of unemployment rates and labor productivity growth rates.  While the projected numbers may not be exact, they are helpful to compare one career to another, or one location to another.

    What is the source of this information?

    State-level data come from Projections Central and each state's Labor Market Information office, 2016-26.

    National-level data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, 2018-28.

Typical wages

Annual wages for Tire Repairers and Changers in United States
This graph displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
This chart displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
LocationUnited States
10%$21,210
25%$24,270
Median$28,640
75%$34,800
90%$41,010


    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you a range of how much most workers in this occupation earn per hour, in the location that you selected.

    You can select from three views of this data:

    • The Graph shows you wages at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles. Note that the lowest (10th %ile) wage shown is not necessarily a "starting wage." Instead it means that 10 percent of all workers in this career earn less that this amount, and 90 percent earn more. However, you can assume that you might earn close to the 10th or 25th %ile wages when you start out in most careers.
    • Select "Chart" to see a visual comparison between national wages and wages in the location you selected.
    • Select "Table" to see more wage data the national and local level.

    Please note that wage data are not available at the city or ZIP code level. If you selected a city or ZIP code, you will see wage data for the regional area.

    You can learn more about wages for this and other occupations by clicking “See more wages” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    The wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program, May 2019 survey. For more detailed state wage data, please find the link to your state's wage data program in the Other Resources box.

Typical education
How much education do most people in this career have?
Chart. Percent of workers in this field by education level attained

    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you the range of education levels that people who currently work in this field have. You can use this to see if you fit in this range. Note that this includes ALL people who work in this field and not just those getting started.

    Interested in getting qualified for this career? You can search for programs that lead to the education needed, in your local area, by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, Educational attainment for workers 25 years and older by detailed occupation, 2016–17.

Certifications: show your skills
Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:
  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find certifications" you'll see a list of national certifications that are related to this career. From there, you can learn how to achieve one of these certifications to help you enter or get ahead in this field.

    What is the source of this information?

    This collection of occupational certifications is collected and regularly updated by CareerOneStop. Learn more at Certification Finder Help.

Licenses: do you need one?
Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find license details in your state" you'll see the license name and contact information for the agency in your state that oversees licensing for this field. If you have not selected a location, you'll see a list of all state licenses for this occupation.

    What is the source of this information?

    Information on licensed occupations is gathered in each state by Labor Market Information units under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. Learn more at License Finder Help.

Apprenticeships: learn on the job
Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.

Activities: what you might do in a day
  • Operate cranes, hoists, or other moving or lifting equipment.
  • Install vehicle parts or accessories.
  • Remove parts or components from vehicles.
  • Test mechanical equipment to ensure proper functioning.
  • Service vehicles to maintain functionality.
  • Repair tires.
  • Assemble mechanical components or machine parts.
  • Reassemble equipment after repair.
  • Inspect mechanical components of vehicles to identify problems.
  • Clean work areas.
  • Smooth surfaces of objects or equipment.
  • Order materials, supplies, or equipment.
  • Disassemble equipment for maintenance or repair.
  • Drive trucks or other vehicles to or at work sites.
  • Clean equipment, parts, or tools to repair or maintain them in good working order.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical work activities that people in this career might do on the job. You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More activities” to see more detailed examples of activities for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these activities to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET’s Detailed Work Activities.

Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of general knowledge areas that are most commonly required for jobs in the career. Knowledge is typically gained through education and related experience.

    This list can help you learn if you are prepared for a job in this career. It can also help you decide on education or training programs that could help you prepare for the career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Knowledge descriptors.

Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Trunk Strength - Using your lower back and stomach.
  • Manual Dexterity - Holding or moving items with your hands.
  • Multilimb Coordination - Using your arms and/or legs together while sitting, standing, or lying down.
  • Static Strength - Lifting, pushing, pulling, or carrying.
  • Extent Flexibility - Bending, stretching, twisting, or reaching with your body, arms, and/or legs.
  • Near Vision - Seeing details up close.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list of personal qualities that might influence work and are most commonly required for success in this career.

    This list can help you understand if your natural strengths and abilities are a good fit for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Abilities descriptors.

Interests
  • Conventional - Occupations related to Conventional interests frequently involve following set procedures and routines. They include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Realistic - Occupations with Realistic interests frequently involve practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of work environment-preferences that are most commonly associated with the career. It can help you understand if your natural interests are a good fit for this career.

    Click "Take an interest assessment" for a quick 30-question assessment that can help you understand your interests and see careers that might be good matches for them.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Interest descriptors.

Typical tasks
  • Raise vehicles, using hydraulic jacks.
  • Remount wheels onto vehicles.
  • Unbolt and remove wheels from vehicles, using lug wrenches or other hand or power tools.
  • Place wheels on balancing machines to determine counterweights required to balance wheels.
  • Identify tire size and ply and inflate tires accordingly.
  • Replace valve stems and remove puncturing objects.
  • Hammer required counterweights onto rims of wheels.
  • Seal punctures in tubeless tires by inserting adhesive material and expanding rubber plugs into punctures, using hand tools.
  • Reassemble tires onto wheels.
  • Inspect tire casings for defects, such as holes or tears.
  • Locate punctures in tubeless tires by visual inspection or by immersing inflated tires in water baths and observing air bubbles.
  • Glue tire patches over ruptures in tire casings, using rubber cement.
  • Assist mechanics and perform various mechanical duties, such as changing oil or checking and replacing batteries.
  • Rotate tires to different positions on vehicles, using hand tools.
  • Clean and tidy up the shop.
  • Buff defective areas of inner tubes, using scrapers.
  • Roll new rubber treads, known as camelbacks, over tire casings and mold the semi-raw rubber treads onto the buffed casings.
  • Prepare rims and wheel drums for reassembly by scraping, grinding, or sandblasting.
  • Order replacements for tires or tubes.
  • Apply rubber cement to buffed tire casings prior to vulcanization process.
  • Separate tubed tires from wheels, using rubber mallets and metal bars or mechanical tire changers.
  • Inflate inner tubes and immerse them in water to locate leaks.
  • Patch tubes with adhesive rubber patches or seal rubber patches to tubes, using hot vulcanizing plates.
  • Place tire casings and tread rubber assemblies in tire molds for the vulcanization process and exert pressure to ensure good adhesion.
  • Drive automobile or service trucks to industrial sites to provide services or respond to emergency calls.
  • Clean sides of whitewall tires.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical tasks that people in this career might do on the job.  You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More tasks” to see more detailed examples for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these tasks to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET‘s Tasks.

Other resources

    What does this information tell me?

    These are additional online resources related to this career. You may find different or more detailed information at these sources.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information is collected and maintained by CareerOneStop.