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Web Administrators
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Description: what do they do?
Manage web environment design, deployment, development and maintenance activities. Perform testing and quality assurance of web sites and web applications.
Also known as:
Corporate Webmaster, Web Administrator, Web Technologies Administrator, Web Content Coordinator, Webmaster, Web Site Manager, Web Manager, Web Director, Web Content Manager

    What does this information tell me?

    This description is a quick overview of what workers in this career might do.

    "Also known as" shows other common names for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from an O*NET database. Learn more on the Help page.

Career video
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    Transcript: Web administrators bring the components of a website design together, publish it online, and make sure it functions effectively and securely. Web administrators, sometimes called webmasters, keep web page content and links up to date, find and fix web page problems, and implement website security measures such as firewalls or encryption. They follow back-up and recovery procedures regularly. Webmasters work closely with website development teams on both internal and external websites. Usability is critical for websites, and webmasters test and track many aspects of a site’s performance to ensure the site meets its planned function and users have a good experience. Web administrators help create and document guidelines used by everyone who contributes to the website, to ensure consistency and effectiveness. They may also train website users, and teach other staff how to maintain websites. Working in an office during typical office hours is the norm in this field, but work schedules of longer than 40 hours per week are not unusual. The ability to collaborate and communicate well with teammates is essential. While a number of web administrators have a bachelor’s degree, typical job requirements include technical training or an associate’s degree. Regardless of education requirements, positions in this field generally require continuous learning to keep up with the changing world of web development.
View transcript
Outlook: will there be jobs?
Image. Employment outlook for this occupation
New job opportunities are likely in the future.


    What does this information tell me?

    Outlook information can tell you whether a career is expected to be in demand in the future—that is, whether there are likely to be job openings if you choose this career. Careers can have one of three outlooks:

    • A Bright outlook means new job opportunities are very likely in the future
    • An Average outlook means that a small number of new job opportunities are likely in the future (less than an 8 percent increase)
    • A Below Average outlook means new job opportunities are less likely in the future

    You can also view local job listings in this field by clicking "Find job openings" above. This can help you see if local businesses are hiring—another way of looking at demand.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET’s Bright Outlook occupations. Note this information is only available at a national level, so even if you selected a state, you’ll only see this information for the whole country.

Projected employment
Idaho
1,410
2016 Employment
1,570
2026 Employment
11%
Percent change
110
Annual projected job openings
United States
412,800
2018 Employment
455,000
2028 Employment
10%
Percent change
35,700
Annual projected job openings
You’re seeing projected employment information for Computer occupations, all other because we don’t have information for Web Administrators.

    What does this information tell me?

    Projected employment shows how much employment is expected to grow in this occupation over a 10-year period. This can help you decide if this career is a good choice for future job opportunities. You can look at projected employment in your state, or in other states where you might consider living.

    You can see the total number of people employed in this occupation in 2016 (for states) or 2018 (for the United States), the number expected to be employed in 2026 (for states) or 2028 (for the United States), and rate of growth over those years.

    The projections are based on assumptions of unemployment rates and labor productivity growth rates.  While the projected numbers may not be exact, they are helpful to compare one career to another, or one location to another.

    What is the source of this information?

    State-level data come from Projections Central and each state's Labor Market Information office, 2016-26.

    National-level data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, 2018-28.

Typical wages

Annual wages for Computer Occupations, All Other* in Idaho
This graph displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
* You’re seeing wages for Computer Occupations, All Other because we don’t have information for Web Administrators.
This chart displays wage data.  Find details by selecting the table view.
LocationIdahoUnited States
10%$45,250$47,350
25%$60,810$66,410
Median$78,090$90,270
75%$98,890$117,070
90%$118,340$144,820


    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you a range of how much most workers in this occupation earn per hour, in the location that you selected.

    You can select from three views of this data:

    • The Graph shows you wages at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles. Note that the lowest (10th %ile) wage shown is not necessarily a "starting wage." Instead it means that 10 percent of all workers in this career earn less that this amount, and 90 percent earn more. However, you can assume that you might earn close to the 10th or 25th %ile wages when you start out in most careers.
    • Select "Chart" to see a visual comparison between national wages and wages in the location you selected.
    • Select "Table" to see more wage data the national and local level.

    Please note that wage data are not available at the city or ZIP code level. If you selected a city or ZIP code, you will see wage data for the regional area.

    Also note that in this update, 21 detailed occupations found within the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) were replaced with 10 new aggregations of those occupations; read more about these OES changes.

    You can learn more about wages for this and other occupations by clicking “See more wages” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    The wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program, 2018 data. For more detailed state wage data, please find the link to your state's wage data program in the Other Resources box.

Education and experience: to get started
You’re seeing education information for Computer occupations, all other because we don’t have information for Web Administrators. Please note the information may not be the same for both occupations.

    What does this information tell me?

    This shows you the typical level of education, work experience, and on-the-job training that most people have when they start in this career. Note that these are not requirements for entering this field, but the information can help you understand how qualified you might be.

    Interested in starting in this career? You can search for education programs in your local area by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, Education and training assignments by detailed occupation, 2018.

Typical education
How much education do most people in this career have?
Chart. Percent of workers in this field by education level attained
You’re seeing education information for Computer occupations, all other because we don’t have information for Web Administrators. Please note the information may not be the same for both occupations.

    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you the range of education levels that people who currently work in this field have. You can use this to see if you fit in this range. Note that this includes ALL people who work in this field and not just those getting started.

    Interested in getting qualified for this career? You can search for programs that lead to the education needed, in your local area, by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, Educational attainment for workers 25 years and older by detailed occupation, 2016–17.

Certifications: show your skills
Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:
  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find certifications" you'll see a list of national certifications that are related to this career. From there, you can learn how to achieve one of these certifications to help you enter or get ahead in this field.

    What is the source of this information?

    This collection of occupational certifications is collected and regularly updated by CareerOneStop. Learn more at Certification Finder Help.

Licenses: do you need one?
Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find license details in your state" you'll see the license name and contact information for the agency in your state that oversees licensing for this field. If you have not selected a location, you'll see a list of all state licenses for this occupation.

    What is the source of this information?

    Information on licensed occupations is gathered in each state by Labor Market Information units under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. Learn more at License Finder Help.

Apprenticeships: learn on the job
Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find apprenticeship sponsors" you'll find information that can help you locate apprenticeship opportunities in your state:

    • If there are businesses that have sponsored apprenticeships in this field in the past, you'll find their name and contact information.
    • If there are related occupations that might have apprenticeship opportunities, you'll find links to that information.
    • You'll also see contact information for state and federal agencies that oversee apprenticeship programs.

    What is the source of this information?

    Apprenticeship information comes from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeships, and from CareerOneStop. Learn more at Apprenticeship Finder Help.

Activities: what you might do in a day
  • Collaborate with others to resolve information technology issues.
  • Monitor the security of digital information.
  • Maintain contingency plans for disaster recovery.
  • Document operational procedures.
  • Create electronic data backup to prevent loss of information.
  • Modify software programs to improve performance.
  • Resolve computer software problems.
  • Develop computer or information security policies or procedures.
  • Recommend changes to improve computer or information systems.
  • Maintain computer networks to enhance performance and user access.
  • Implement security measures for computer or information systems.
  • Test computer system operations to ensure proper functioning.
  • Analyze website or related online data to track trends or usage.
  • Manage budgets for appropriate resource allocation.
  • Install computer software.
  • Update website content.
  • Install computer hardware.
  • Document operational activities.
  • Analyze data to identify or resolve operational problems.
  • Design websites or web applications.
  • Update knowledge about emerging industry or technology trends.
  • Document design or development procedures.
  • Develop specifications or procedures for website development or maintenance.
  • Develop performance metrics or standards related to information technology.
  • Identify information technology project resource requirements.
  • Collaborate with others to develop or implement marketing strategies.
  • Train others in computer interface or software use.
  • Provide technical support for software maintenance or use.
  • Develop testing routines or procedures.
  • Test software performance.
  • Implement advertising or marketing initiatives.
  • Provide recommendations to others about computer hardware.
  • Evaluate utility of software or hardware technologies.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical work activities that people in this career might do on the job. You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More activities” to see more detailed examples of activities for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these activities to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET’s Detailed Work Activities.

Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Communications and Media - Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of general knowledge areas that are most commonly required for jobs in the career. Knowledge is typically gained through education and related experience.

    This list can help you learn if you are prepared for a job in this career. It can also help you decide on education or training programs that could help you prepare for the career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Knowledge descriptors.

Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Critical Thinking - Thinking about the pros and cons of different ways to solve a problem.
  • Reading Comprehension - Reading work-related information.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Noticing a problem and figuring out the best way to solve it.
  • Active Listening - Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.
  • Monitoring - Keeping track of how well people and/or groups are doing in order to make improvements.
  • Systems Evaluation - Measuring how well a system is working and how to improve it.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Thinking about the pros and cons of different options and picking the best one.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list the work-related skills most commonly required for jobs in the career.

    This list can help you understand how well your current skills fit this career. It can also help you plan your education or professional development.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Skills descriptors.

Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Oral Comprehension - Listening and understanding what people say.
  • Written Comprehension - Reading and understanding what is written.
  • Deductive Reasoning - Using rules to solve problems.
  • Oral Expression - Communicating by speaking.
  • Near Vision - Seeing details up close.
  • Problem Sensitivity - Noticing when problems happen.
  • Inductive Reasoning - Making general rules or coming up with answers from lots of detailed information.
  • Written Expression - Communicating by writing.
  • Information Ordering - Ordering or arranging things.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list of personal qualities that might influence work and are most commonly required for success in this career.

    This list can help you understand if your natural strengths and abilities are a good fit for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Abilities descriptors.

Interests
  • Conventional - Occupations related to Conventional interests frequently involve following set procedures and routines. They include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Enterprising - Occupations with Enterprising interests frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. Many involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Investigative - Occupations with Investigative interests frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. They often involve research and figuring out problems mentally.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of work environment-preferences that are most commonly associated with the career. It can help you understand if your natural interests are a good fit for this career.

    Click "Take an interest assessment" for a quick 30-question assessment that can help you understand your interests and see careers that might be good matches for them.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Interest descriptors.

Typical tasks
  • Monitor systems for intrusions or denial of service attacks, and report security breaches to appropriate personnel.
  • Identify or document backup or recovery plans.
  • Back up or modify applications and related data to provide for disaster recovery.
  • Correct testing-identified problems, or recommend actions for their resolution.
  • Identify, standardize, and communicate levels of access and security.
  • Determine sources of Web page or server problems, and take action to correct such problems.
  • Implement updates, upgrades, and patches in a timely manner to limit loss of service.
  • Implement Web site security measures, such as firewalls or message encryption.
  • Collaborate with development teams to discuss, analyze, or resolve usability issues.
  • Test issues such as system integration, performance, and system security on a regular schedule or after any major program modifications.
  • Perform user testing or usage analyses to determine Web sites' effectiveness or usability.
  • Track, compile, and analyze Web site usage data.
  • Document application and Web site changes or change procedures.
  • Test backup or recovery plans regularly and resolve any problems.
  • Recommend Web site improvements, and develop budgets to support recommendations.
  • Install or configure Web server software or hardware to ensure that directory structure is well-defined, logical, and secure, and that files are named properly.
  • Review or update Web page content or links in a timely manner, using appropriate tools.
  • Gather, analyze, or document user feedback to locate or resolve sources of problems.
  • Set up or maintain monitoring tools on Web servers or Web sites.
  • Administer internet or intranet infrastructure, including Web, file, and mail servers.
  • Monitor Web developments through continuing education, reading, or participation in professional conferences, workshops, or groups.
  • Develop or document style guidelines for Web site content.
  • Develop Web site performance metrics.
  • Identify or address interoperability requirements.
  • Collaborate with Web developers to create and operate internal and external Web sites, or to manage projects, such as e-marketing campaigns.
  • Develop or implement procedures for ongoing Web site revision.
  • Check and analyze operating system or application log files regularly to verify proper system performance.
  • Provide training or technical assistance in Web site implementation or use.
  • Evaluate testing routines or procedures for adequacy, sufficiency, and effectiveness.
  • Inform Web site users of problems, problem resolutions, or application changes and updates.
  • Document installation or configuration procedures to allow maintenance and repetition.
  • Develop testing routines and procedures.
  • Test new software packages for use in Web operations or other applications.
  • Develop and implement marketing plans for home pages, including print advertising or advertisement rotation.
  • Evaluate or recommend server hardware or software.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical tasks that people in this career might do on the job.  You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More tasks” to see more detailed examples for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these tasks to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET‘s Tasks.

    What does this information tell me?

    These are additional online resources related to this career. You may find different or more detailed information at these sources.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information is collected and maintained by CareerOneStop.