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Learn more about Career Reports.

CareerOneStop offers several Career Reports to help career explorers, job seekers, and others learn more about the job market:

What information do Career Reports show?

Highest-Paying Careers shows a list of careers with the highest median wages for the latest year that wage data are available (currently this is 2016). For each career, you’ll see:

  • The official occupation name. Click this link to view a full profile of information about this career.
  • Median wages for 2016, shown both hourly and yearly.  If you see "N/A", wages for that career are not available.
  • Typical education shows the amount of education that most workers have when they enter the career

Fastest-Growing Careers and Careers with Declining Employment show lists of careers where employment is expected to either grow the fastest or shrink the most from 2014 to 2024. Note that growth is based on the expected percent change over those ten years, so these are not necessarily the careers expected to have the largest or smallest number of openings (for instance, a career with very few jobs can be expected to grow at a very high rate). For each career on these lists, you’ll see:

  • The official occupation name. Click this link to view a full profile of information about this career.
  • Employment, or the number of people employed in this career for 2014, followed by the number expected to be employed in 2024. If you see "N/A", employment numbers for that career are not available for the location you've selected. Try selecting a larger area.
  • Percent change, or the rate of employment growth expected over the ten years
  • Earnings, shown by green dollar sign symbols representing four categories of average wages:
  • 4 dollar signs ($$$$) = Very high (Greater than $51,580)
  • 3 dollar signs ($$$) = High ($32,930 to $51,450)
  • 2 dollar signs ($$) = Low ($21,790 and $32,380)
  • 1 dollar sign ($) = Very low (Less than $21,550)
  • Typical education, or the amount of education that most workers have when they enter the career

Careers with Largest Employment shows a list of careers with the largest number people employed. The numbers are shown for the latest year the data are available (currently, 2014). For each career on the list, you’ll see:

  • The official occupation name. Click this link to view a full profile of information about this career.
  • Employment, or the number of people employed in this career in 2014. If you see "N/A", employment numbers for that career are not available for the location you've selected. Try selecting a larger area.
  • Earnings, shown by green dollar sign symbols representing four categories of average wages:
  • 4 dollar signs ($$$$) = Very high (Greater than $51,580)
  • 3 dollar signs ($$$) = High ($32,930 to $51,450)
  • 2 dollar signs ($$) = Low ($21,790 and $32,380)
  • 1 dollar sign ($) = Very low (Less than $21,550)
  • Typical education, or the amount of education that most workers have when they enter the career

Careers with Most Openings shows a list of careers expected to have the most job openings from 2014 to 2024. For each career on the list, you’ll see:

  • The official occupation name. Click this link to view a full profile of information about this career.
  • Employment, or the number of people employed in this career in 2014. If you see "N/A", employment numbers for that career are not available for the location you've selected. Try selecting a larger area.
  • Projected annual openings, or the average number of job openings expected in each year between 2014 and 2015
  • Earnings, shown by green dollar sign symbols representing four categories of average wages:
    • 4 dollar signs ($$$$) = Very high (Greater than $51,580)
    • 3 dollar signs ($$$) = High ($32,930 to $51,450)
    • 2 dollar signs ($$) = Low ($21,790 and $32,380)
    • 1 dollar sign ($) = Very low (Less than $21,550)
  • Typical education, or the amount of education that most workers have when they enter the career

You can view each of these lists for any state or for the United States as a whole. Select your preferred location in the Your Search box at upper left of any report.

Where does this information come from?

Data in these reports come from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Employment, percent change, and projected annual openings data come from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections, Employment Projections: 2014–24.

Earnings and wage data come from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) 2016 survey. Wage estimates include base rate, cost-of-living allowances, guaranteed pay, hazardous-duty pay, incentive pay (e.g. commissions and production bonuses), and on-call pay. Wage estimates do not include back pay, jury duty pay, overtime pay, severance pay, shift differentials, nonproduction bonuses, and tuition reimbursements.

Typical education data come from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistic’s Education and Training Data, Educational attainment for workers 25 years and older by detailed occupation, 2014–15. Typical education reflects the typical level of education that most workers need to enter the occupation. Occupations are assigned one of the following eight education levels:

  • Doctoral or professional degree
  • Master's degree
  • Bachelor's degree
  • Associate's degree
  • Postsecondary non-degree award
  • Some college, no degree
  • High school diploma or equivalent

What can I do with these reports?

You can learn more about any career that you find on one of the Career Reports by clicking on the Occupation Titles. 
You can also filter any of these lists by education level, using the links on the left-hand side of any report. This can help create lists that match your own education level or your future education plans.

Can I save my list of results?

To download and save your results in a document, click the Download button at the bottom of your results list, and choose from Excel, PDF, Word, or RTF formats.

To email or print your results, use the links at the bottom of the page.

Who can I contact for more help?

If you have questions about any of the schools you find listed, please find and use contact information on the school's website.

If you have questions or comments about how this tool works, please contact the CareerOneStop Service Center at info@careeronestop.org.