Skip to Content
Logo Careeronestop
careeronestop
your source for career exploration, training & jobs
Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor.
A proud partner of the american job center network.

Occupation Profile

Learn details about any occupation including what you might do on the job, how much you might earn, and how much education or training you might need.

Get started by entering a keyword for a career, a job title, or a type of work in the box below. Then enter your location and click "Search". Or, click "List of Occupations" to select from a list of careers.

Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers
Show More

Select items to add to your view

Overview


Employment


Wages

Education





Job Details






More Info


= not available for this occupation
Description: what do they do?
Install, set-up, rearrange, or remove switching, distribution, routing, and dialing equipment used in central offices or headends. Service or repair telephone, cable television, Internet, and other communications equipment on customers' property. May install communications equipment or communications wiring in buildings.
Also known as:
Combination Technician, Telecommunications Technician, Broadband Technician, Installer, Customer Service Technician (CST), Central Office Technician, Service Technician, Install and Repair Technician, Outside Plant Technician, Field Technician

    What does this information tell me?

    This description is a quick overview of what workers in this career might do.

    "Also known as" shows other common names for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from an O*NET database. Learn more on the Help page.

Career video
00:00
00:00

    Transcript: On a daily basis, businesses and individuals send and receive vast amounts of data through online communications. Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers install and service this equipment. Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers— also called telecom technicians— set up and maintain equipment that carries communications signals, connects to telephone lines, and accesses the Internet. They also demonstrate and explain the use of equipment to customers and keep records of jobs they’ve completed. Job tasks for these technicians vary depending on their specialization: Central office technicians maintain switches, routers, fiber optic cable, and other equipment at switching hubs, called central offices. “Headend” technicians work at distribution centers for cable and television companies. They monitor cable network signals and maintain networking equipment to ensure proper transmission. Station installers and repairers set up telecommunications equipment in homes and businesses, and troubleshoot equipment problems if they come up. Most telecom technicians work full time. At companies that provide services 24/7, shift work is typical, and may include evenings, holidays, and weekends— with some workers on call around the clock. Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers typically need technical training in electronics, telecommunications, or computer technology. Courses are usually offered at community colleges and technical schools. For some positions, industry certification is helpful. Once hired, telecom technicians receive on-the-job training.
View transcript
Outlook: will there be jobs?
Image. Employment outlook for this occupation
New job opportunities are less likely in the future.


    What does this information tell me?

    Outlook information can tell you whether a career is expected to be in demand in the future—that is, whether there are likely to be job openings if you choose this career. Careers can have one of three outlooks:

    • A Bright outlook means new job opportunities are very likely in the future
    • An Average outlook means that a small number of new job opportunities are likely in the future (less than an 8 percent increase)
    • A Below Average outlook means new job opportunities are less likely in the future

    You can also view local job listings in this field by clicking "Find job openings" above. This can help you see if local businesses are hiring—another way of looking at demand.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET’s Bright Outlook occupations. Note this information is only available at a national level, so even if you selected a state, you’ll only see this information for the whole country.

Projected employment
Kentucky
3,360
2016 Employment
3,420
2026 Employment
2%
Percent change
360
Annual projected job openings
United States
237,600
2016 Employment
219,400
2026 Employment
-8%
Percent change
21,900
Annual projected job openings

    What does this information tell me?

    Projected employment shows how much employment is expected to grow in this occupation over a 10-year period. This can help you decide if this career is a good choice for future job opportunities. You can look at projected employment in your state, or in other states where you might consider living.

    You can see the total number of people employed in this occupation in 2016, the number expected to be employed in 2026, and rate of growth over those years.

    The projections are based on assumptions of unemployment rates and labor productivity growth rates.  While the projected numbers may not be exact, they are helpful to compare one career to another, or one location to another.

    What is the source of this information?

    State-level data come from Projections Central and each state's Labor Market Information office.

    National-level data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections, 2016-26.

Typical wages

Annual wages for Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers in Kentucky
LocationKentuckyUnited States
10%$27,400$31,100
25%$35,340$39,920
Median$47,000$53,380
75%$65,330$70,350
90%$76,640$80,530


    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you a range of how much most workers in this occupation earn per hour, in the location that you selected.

    You can select from three views of this data:

    • The Graph shows you wages at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles. Note that the lowest (10th %ile) wage shown is not necessarily a "starting wage." Instead it means that 10 percent of all workers in this career earn less that this amount, and 90 percent earn more. However, you can assume that you might earn close to the 10th or 25th %ile wages when you start out in most careers.
    • Select "Chart" to see a visual comparison between national wages and wages in the location you selected.
    • Select "Table" to see more wage data the national and local level.

    Please note that wage data are not available at the city or ZIP code level. If you selected a city or ZIP code, you will see wage data for the regional area.

    Also note that in this update, 21 detailed occupations found within the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) were replaced with 10 new aggregations of those occupations; read more about these OES changes.

    You can learn more about wages for this and other occupations by clicking “See more wages” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    The wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program, 2017 data. For more detailed state wage data, please find the link to your state's wage data program in the Other Resources box.

Education and experience: to get started
People starting in this career usually have:
  • Postsecondary certificate
  • No work experience
  • 1 to 12 months on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:

    What does this information tell me?

    This shows you the typical level of education, work experience, and on-the-job training that most people have when they start in this career. Note that these are not requirements for entering this field, but the information can help you understand how qualified you might be.

    Interested in starting in this career? You can search for education programs in your local area by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections Education and Training Data.

Typical education
How much education do most people in this career have?
Chart. Percent of workers in this field by education level attained

    What does this information tell me?

    This chart shows you the range of education levels that people who currently work in this field have. You can use this to see if you fit in this range. Note that this includes ALL people who work in this field and not just those getting started.

    Interested in getting qualified for this career? You can search for programs that lead to the education needed, in your local area, by clicking “Find local training” above.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections Education and Training Data.

Certifications: show your skills
Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:
  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find certifications" you'll see a list of national certifications that are related to this career. From there, you can learn how to achieve one of these certifications to help you enter or get ahead in this field.

    What is the source of this information?

    This collection of occupational certifications is collected and regularly updated by CareerOneStop. Learn more at Certification Finder Help.

Licenses: do you need one?
Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find license details in your state" you'll see the license name and contact information for the agency in your state that oversees licensing for this field. If you have not selected a location, you'll see a list of all state licenses for this occupation.

    What is the source of this information?

    Information on licensed occupations is gathered in each state by Labor Market Information units under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. Learn more at License Finder Help.

Apprenticeships: learn on the job
Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.

    What does this information tell me?

    When you click "Find apprenticeship sponsors" you'll find information that can help you locate apprenticeship opportunities in your state:

    • If there are businesses that have sponsored apprenticeships in this field in the past, you'll find their name and contact information.
    • If there are related occupations that might have apprenticeship opportunities, you'll find links to that information.
    • You'll also see contact information for state and federal agencies that oversee apprenticeship programs.

    What is the source of this information?

    Apprenticeship information comes from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeships, and from CareerOneStop. Learn more at Apprenticeship Finder Help.

Activities: what you might do in a day
  • Explain use of products or services.
  • Test electrical circuits or components for proper functioning.
  • Test communications equipment to ensure proper functioning.
  • Climb equipment or structures to access work areas.
  • Run wiring to connect equipment.
  • Assemble electrical components, subsystems, or systems.
  • Install electrical components, equipment, or systems.
  • Drive trucks or other vehicles to or at work sites.
  • Gather information about work conditions or locations.
  • Inspect telecommunications equipment to identify problems.
  • Clean work areas.
  • Confer with coworkers to resolve equipment problems.
  • Repair electronic equipment.
  • Connect electrical components or equipment.
  • Document operational activities.
  • Determine types of equipment, tools, or materials needed for jobs.
  • Rewire electrical or electronic systems.
  • Troubleshoot equipment or systems operation problems.
  • Maintain work equipment or machinery.
  • Clean equipment, parts, or tools to repair or maintain them in good working order.
  • Service vehicles to maintain functionality.
  • Install programs onto computer or computer-controlled equipment.
  • Analyze test or performance data to assess equipment operation.
  • Enter codes or other information into computers.
  • Adjust equipment to ensure optimal performance.
  • Lubricate equipment to allow proper functioning.
  • Paint surfaces or equipment.
  • Repair electrical components.
  • Read technical information needed to perform maintenance or repairs.
  • Dig holes or trenches.
  • Interpret blueprints, specifications, or diagrams to inform installation, development or operation activities.
  • Advise others on issues related to repairs, installation, or equipment design.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical work activities that people in this career might do on the job. You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More activities” to see more detailed examples of activities for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these activities to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET’s Detailed Work Activities.

Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Telecommunications - Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of general knowledge areas that are most commonly required for jobs in the career. Knowledge is typically gained through education and related experience.

    This list can help you learn if you are prepared for a job in this career. It can also help you decide on education or training programs that could help you prepare for the career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Knowledge descriptors.

Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the right tools.
  • Troubleshooting - Figuring out what is causing equipment, machines, wiring, or computer programs to not work.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Testing how well a product or service works.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or display screens to make sure a machine is working.
  • Critical Thinking - Thinking about the pros and cons of different ways to solve a problem.
  • Active Listening - Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Planning and doing the basic maintenance on equipment.
  • Monitoring - Keeping track of how well people and/or groups are doing in order to make improvements.
  • Reading Comprehension - Reading work-related information.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Noticing a problem and figuring out the best way to solve it.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list the work-related skills most commonly required for jobs in the career.

    This list can help you understand how well your current skills fit this career. It can also help you plan your education or professional development.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Skills descriptors.

Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Near Vision - Seeing details up close.
  • Visual Color Discrimination - Noticing the difference between colors, including shades and brightness.
  • Oral Comprehension - Listening and understanding what people say.
  • Problem Sensitivity - Noticing when problems happen.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness - Keeping your arm or hand steady.
  • Finger Dexterity - Putting together small parts with your fingers.
  • Manual Dexterity - Holding or moving items with your hands.
  • Deductive Reasoning - Using rules to solve problems.
  • Information Ordering - Ordering or arranging things.
  • Inductive Reasoning - Making general rules or coming up with answers from lots of detailed information.
  • Speech Recognition - Recognizing spoken words.
  • Oral Expression - Communicating by speaking.
  • Flexibility of Closure - Seeing hidden patterns.
  • Multilimb Coordination - Using your arms and/or legs together while sitting, standing, or lying down.
  • Speech Clarity - Speaking clearly.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of a list of personal qualities that might influence work and are most commonly required for success in this career.

    This list can help you understand if your natural strengths and abilities are a good fit for this career.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Abilities descriptors.

Interests
  • Conventional - Occupations related to Conventional interests frequently involve following set procedures and routines. They include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Investigative - Occupations with Investigative interests frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. They often involve research and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Realistic - Occupations with Realistic interests frequently involve practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of work environment-preferences that are most commonly associated with the career. It can help you understand if your natural interests are a good fit for this career.

    Click "Take an interest assessment" for a quick 30-question assessment that can help you understand your interests and see careers that might be good matches for them.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from the O*NET Resource Center. Learn more about O*NET's Interest descriptors.

Typical tasks
  • Demonstrate equipment to customers and explain how it is to be used, and respond to any inquiries or complaints.
  • Test circuits and components of malfunctioning telecommunications equipment to isolate sources of malfunctions, using test meters, circuit diagrams, polarity probes, and other hand tools.
  • Test repaired, newly installed, or updated equipment to ensure that it functions properly and conforms to specifications, using test equipment and observation.
  • Climb poles and ladders, use truck-mounted booms, and enter areas such as manholes and cable vaults to install, maintain, or inspect equipment.
  • Run wires between components and to outside cable systems, connecting them to wires from telephone poles or underground cable accesses.
  • Assemble and install communication equipment such as data and telephone communication lines, wiring, switching equipment, wiring frames, power apparatus, computer systems, and networks.
  • Drive crew trucks to and from work areas.
  • Test connections to ensure that power supplies are adequate and that communications links function.
  • Note differences in wire and cable colors so that work can be performed correctly.
  • Inspect equipment on a regular basis to ensure proper functioning.
  • Remove loose wires and other debris after work is completed.
  • Collaborate with other workers to locate and correct malfunctions.
  • Repair or replace faulty equipment such as defective and damaged telephones, wires, switching system components, and associated equipment.
  • Route and connect cables and lines to switches, switchboard equipment, and distributing frames, using wire-wrap guns or soldering irons to connect wires to terminals.
  • Maintain computer and manual records pertaining to facilities and equipment.
  • Communicate with bases, using telephones or two-way radios to receive instructions or technical advice, or to report equipment status.
  • Designate cables available for use.
  • Remove and remake connections to change circuit layouts, following work orders or diagrams.
  • Diagnose and correct problems from remote locations, using special switchboards to find the sources of problems.
  • Clean and maintain tools, test equipment, and motor vehicles.
  • Request support from technical service centers when on-site procedures fail to solve installation or maintenance problems.
  • Program computerized switches and switchboards to provide requested features.
  • Analyze test readings, computer printouts, and trouble reports to determine equipment repair needs and required repair methods.
  • Examine telephone transmission facilities to determine requirements for new or additional telephone services.
  • Enter codes needed to correct electronic switching system programming.
  • Install updated software, and programs that maintain existing software or provide requested features such as time-correlated call routing.
  • Adjust or modify equipment to enhance equipment performance or to respond to customer requests.
  • Perform routine maintenance on equipment, including adjusting and lubricating components, and painting worn or exposed areas.
  • Determine viability of sites through observation, and discuss site locations and construction requirements with customers.
  • Remove and replace plug-in circuit equipment.
  • Refer to manufacturers' manuals to obtain maintenance instructions pertaining to specific malfunctions.
  • Install telephone station equipment, such as intercommunication systems, transmitters, receivers, relays, and ringers, and related apparatus, such as coin collectors, telephone booths, and switching-key equipment.
  • Dig holes or trenches as necessary for equipment installation and access.
  • Clean switches and replace contact points, using vacuum hoses, solvents, and hand tools.
  • Review manufacturer's instructions, manuals, technical specifications, building permits, and ordinances to determine communication equipment requirements and procedures.
  • Provide input into the design and manufacturing of new equipment.
  • Place intercept circuits on terminals to handle vacant lines in central office installations.

    What does this information tell me?

    This is a list of typical tasks that people in this career might do on the job.  You can use this list to get an idea of whether this career might be a good fit for you.

    Click on “More tasks” to see more detailed examples for this career.

    You can also use this list to help you prepare for a job interview. Or, if you’ve already held a job like this, you can copy these tasks to use on your resume.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information comes from O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information. They are O*NET‘s Tasks.

    What does this information tell me?

    These are additional online resources related to this career. You may find different or more detailed information at these sources.

    What is the source of this information?

    This information is collected and maintained by CareerOneStop.