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Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers Career Video

Description: Conduct sub-surface surveys to identify the characteristics of potential land or mining development sites. May specify the ground support systems, processes and equipment for safe, economical, and environmentally sound extraction or underground construction activities. May inspect areas for unsafe geological conditions, equipment, and working conditions. May design, implement, and coordinate mine safety programs.


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Video Transcript

Mining and geological engineers design mines above and below the ground to remove minerals and metals used by manufacturing industries and utilities. They design methods to transport mined materials to processing plants, and monitor operations for safety and efficiency. Critically, they also develop solutions to manage mines’ environmental impacts, including land reclamation, and mitigating water and air pollution. Three types of engineers typically work in mining. Geological Engineers search for mineral deposits and evaluate possible sites, then plan how to extract the metals or minerals safely and efficiently. Mining Engineers specialize in mining a particular mineral or metal, such as coal or gold. Some develop new equipment or direct processing operations. Mining Safety Engineers ensure that workers are safe and mines meet safety regulations. They monitor air quality, and inspect mines and equipment for possible hazards. Mining engineers often work at mining operations in remote locations, although some work in sand-and-gravel operations near cities, or at mining firms or consulting companies in large urban areas. Most work full time, with additional hours when posted at mining sites. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited engineering program is required to become a mining or geological engineer. Relatively few schools offer the program. Licensure is not required for entry level jobs, but many experienced engineers obtain licensure for more advanced positions.