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Geneticists Career Video

Description: Research and study the inheritance of traits at the molecular, organism or population level. May evaluate or treat patients with genetic disorders.


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Video Transcript

A geneticist is a biologist who studies the inheritance of traits in living organisms. Geneticists extract DNA and perform tests, then interpret the laboratory results. They apply their knowledge of statistics and math to evaluate genetic data, and keep detailed records to record their results. Some geneticists study genetic disorders carried from parents to children, and research potential cures and treatments. They may also teach medical students and graduate students, and may need to write grant proposals to seek research funds. Other geneticists diagnose hereditary conditions in patients and treat them. Geneticists may also consult on criminal cases to help officials positively identify suspects using DNA analysis, or team up with archaeologists to study ancient organic matter. Other geneticists focus on improving agricultural crop resilience and productivity. Geneticists continue to read and study throughout their careers and keep up with changes in the field. Many involved in research attend and may also present their findings at conferences. Most positions require a master’s degree or Ph.D. in genetics, and many also require work experience in the field. Clinical geneticists must complete a Doctor of Medicine degree, followed by a medical residency in genetics. A license is required for all physicians and may be required for some other positions.