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Athletic Trainers Career Video

Description: Evaluate and advise individuals to assist recovery from or avoid athletic-related injuries or illnesses, or maintain peak physical fitness. May provide first aid or emergency care.


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Video Transcript

One of the key players on any sports team never takes the field. Athletic trainers work in the background to keep players in top shape. The most important part of the athletic trainer’s job is helping athletes prevent and recover from sports injuries. Working closely with team doctors, trainers wrap injuries and supervise physical therapy. Trainers spend a lot of time in gyms and locker rooms, as well as on the road traveling to sporting events. They study practice sessions and provide individualized exercise routines for athletes to improve their performance. Game times are usually at night, on weekends or holidays. A trainer might need to find other employment during the off-season. Athletic trainers work with athletes in a wide variety of settings: colleges and universities, high schools, clinics, hospitals, the military and law enforcement, as well as the performing arts. The highest-profile jobs are with professional teams. A love of sports is a good starting point, but a master’s degree in athletic training, sports medicine, physical education or a related field is usually required to enter the field. Many states require a professional license. No matter the setting or the sport, the greatest reward for an athletic trainer is helping athletes achieve their personal best.