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Career Videos

Midwives Career Video

Description: Provide prenatal care and childbirth assistance.


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Video Transcript

Midwives work with their patients once their pregnancy is confirmed, from prenatal care, through labor and delivery, and even for a time after the baby is born. They are particularly skilled at providing comfort, relaxation, and reassurance during labor. Midwives counsel women on nutrition during and after pregnancy, teach patients and family members what to expect both physically and emotionally from pregnancy and birth, and how to care for a newborn. They perform physical examinations, evaluate patients’ lab and medical records, run blood tests, and consult with other healthcare practitioners as needed. The midwife also cares for the newborn, administering medical care, including emergency care. Midwives provide general gynecological care as well, including exams, disease prevention and treatment, and family planning. Most midwives work in hospitals or clinics, and sometimes help women deliver babies at home if a pregnancy is low-risk and labor does not present complications. Midwives’ education levels vary quite a bit, although many positions require either a related bachelor’s degree, or graduation from a midwifery program, along with significant related work experience. Many states require licensure.