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Massage Therapists Career Video

Description: Perform therapeutic massages of soft tissues and joints. May assist in the assessment of range of motion and muscle strength, or propose client therapy plans.


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Video Transcript

Whether a patient calls for a relaxing treat… or help recovering from an injury…. massage therapists provide an important part of their wellness care. While massage is popular now due to the natural health movement and interest in prevention, massage therapy has its roots in ancient health care practices. Massage therapists massage and knead patients’ soft tissues to treat medical conditions, injuries, or to maintain health. Using their knowledge of basic anatomy, they may assess range of motion and tissue condition to determine the best techniques to use. Talking with patients beforehand about their symptoms is as important as maintaining communication throughout the massage and keeping health records afterward. Massage therapists learn particular techniques, like sports massage, reflexology, or deep tissue massage. They may work for themselves, in a rehabilitation practice, a massage clinic, at a spa, or even for a sports team. Massage therapists must typically complete a training program, typically between 500-1000 hours of study, to develop these specialized skills. Most states also have licensure and practice requirements. Becoming a massage therapist can be a first step in a health care career. Many health care providers understand the benefits of massage, and include these services in their treatment plans. Whichever setting these professionals choose, their skills are a welcome addition to their patients’ care.