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Career Videos

Tour Guides and Escorts Career Video

Description: Escort individuals or groups on sightseeing tours or through places of interest, such as industrial establishments, public buildings, and art galleries.


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Video Transcript

Meeting new people, sharing their knowledge and enthusiasm for a place, and being on the go– tour guides and travel guides introduce groups and individuals to places of interest and travel experiences. Tour guides escort people on sightseeing tours, cruises, or through public buildings, art galleries, or industrial sites. They describe points of interest and respond to questions. Many tour guides research topics related to their site such as history, art, or corporate culture. Guides often plan commentary or activities for tours for audiences of all ages. Tour guides greet and register visitors, provide printed or digital information, and often collect fees and tickets. Travel guides plan and operate long distance tours and expeditions for clients. They organize itineraries, research local attractions, and make arrangements for accommodations, dining, and access to medical care. They often lead groups to tour site locations and describe them in depth. Typically, they ensure travelers’ needs are met, pay the bills on site, and handle all paperwork. Some travel guides may fly airplanes or drive vehicles to tour sites, set up camp, and prepare meals. Some also instruct travelers—for example teaching wilderness survival skills. Skills in public speaking and customer service are essential, as is the ability to solve problems as they come up. Guides are typically responsible for the safety of groups, and may provide first aid or handle emergencies. Education qualifications vary significantly; tour and travel guides may need to be bilingual, have relevant specialized skills, a related degree or work experience. Many employers provide on-the-job training.