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Career Videos

File Clerks Career Video

Description: Receive and process incoming orders for materials, merchandise, classified ads, or services such as repairs, installations, or rental of facilities. Generally receives orders via mail, phone, fax, or other electronic means. Duties include informing customers of receipt, prices, shipping dates, and delays; preparing contracts; and handling complaints.


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Video Transcript

“Keeping information organized and getting things done” could be the motto of information clerks everywhere. And they do work everywhere— courts of law, hospitals, license offices, airports… just about every business out there... employs information clerks. Information clerks process many kinds of information both online and in print. They receive requests, orders, and applications, explain procedures, enter and retrieve data, and file documents. Some—such as front desk clerks— interact with the public frequently, and also handle fees and payments. These clerks often administer private information, so integrity is an essential quality in this field. They are also skilled at using different office equipment and have an excellent understanding of data storage tools and procedures. Although information clerks are employed in many industries, most work in government agencies, hotels, and healthcare facilities. While most work normal fulltime office hours, part-time schedules are common for file clerks and hotel clerks, who also often work evenings, weekends, and holidays. For those clerks who deal with dissatisfied customers, positions can be stressful at times. Clerks who work at airline ticket —or shipping—counters handle heavy luggage or packages, sometimes up to 100 pounds. Information clerks typically need a high school diploma and learn their skills on the job. In some positions, employers may prefer candidates with college experience or an associate’s degree.